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M. A. Global Policy Degree Information

MASTER OF ARTS IN GLOBAL POLICY

The Global Policy degree is a two-year Master’s program open to students with a bachelor’s degree. An undergraduate degree in policy is not essential for admission. SPIA is much more concerned with the applicant’s capacity for graduate study and the quality of previous academic work at the undergraduate level. However, there are certain prerequisites that the student is required to have completed before entering the graduate program.

PREREQUISITES:

  • Intermediate Microeconomic and Macroeconomic Theory (equivalent to UMaine’s ECO 321 and 350);
  • Introductory Statistics (equivalent to UMaine’s MAT 215 or 232); and
  • Competency in a foreign language at the intermediate level (at least one university course at the 300-level, or demonstration of spoken and written language competency).

The above courses must be completed with a grade of B or better.  Foreign language competency is desired as it provides increased career flexibility and is needed for international placements for the required internship experience.  Applicants without the required background may be accepted provisionally while meeting these prerequisites. Individuals with appropriate work history may be able to waive some course prerequisites with approval from the graduate coordinator.

CORE CURRICULUM
Core seminars define the body of knowledge considered fundamental to the student’s ability to assume a role in global public policy development and analysis. Some seminars will be team-taught by multiple faculty members providing students with perspectives from various academic experiences and familiarizing students with faculty and their specializations.

All students are required to take the five core courses below and participate in an internship.

SPI 501 Methods of Inquiry and Research (3 credits)
How to study international policy issues; approaches; social science theory and research methods; policy analysis.

SPI 502 Contemporary Issues in World Economy (3 credits)
How the world economy works; its relation to economic growth, the distribution of wealth, sustainable development, culture, and political power.

SPI 503 Contemporary International Relations (3 credits)
The workings of the international system; evolution of international relations and the present era of transition in the international system.

SPI 504 Global Justice (3 credits)
A study of moral and political philosophies developed in response to the issues and challenges raised by globalization. These include such topics as global institutions and democracy, distributive justice, fair trade, intellectual property, environmental justice, human rights, immigration, war, and terrorism.

SPI 510 Public Service Seminar (1 credit)
Introduce students to the theory and practice of public service through conversations with practitioners.  To be completed before the required internship.

SPI 595 Internship (2-6 credits depending upon the nature, duration and value of the experience) All students will complete an internship at an appropriate institution or business. One goal of these internships is for students to gain experience and an understanding of what other societies, governments, and organizations are doing to influence policy debates and/or managing their own problems.  Another goal of the internship would be to further a student’s language proficiency.  In turn, the internship should be performed outside of the student’s home country.

CONCENTRATIONS
Each specialization will concentrate on policy and policy choices. Students should learn how to analyze situations, evaluate courses of action, and make recommendations.

International Environmental Policy (18 credits)
This concentration enables students to evaluate and design environmental policies, taking into consideration biological and ecological complexity, economic tradeoffs, the design of regulatory and non-regulatory approaches to environmental sustainability, and the political process. The major emphasis here will be on an in-depth understanding of the policy process, program evaluation, and impact of environmental policy recommendations.
All students in this concentration will be required to take: ECO 450 International environmental economics and policy (3 credits, description below), and will be required to take three additional graduate policy-related courses (9 credits) from list A below plus two courses (6 credits) in environmental analysis at the 400 or higher level from list B below. Other courses must be approved by the graduate coordinator.
ECO 450 International environmental economics and policy
The basics of environmental economics and policy, and the economics behind international trade, and its effects on economic growth and development. The course examines alternative causes of international environmental problems and explores solutions through the application of international environmental economics and policy. Explores the processes of international policy development: identifying problems, designing and negotiating solutions, and implementing policies to change national behavior.

Preapproved Electives (all 3 Credits unless noted).  To provide students with flexibility in course selection appropriate to their career goals, other courses can be substituted with approval from the SPIA graduate coordinator.

A. Policy-related:
ECO 443 Introduction to Modern Economic Growth
ECO 445 Urban-Regional Economics
ECO 449 International Trade
ECO 473 Economic and Policy Applications of GIS
ECO 479 Land Use Planning
ECO 511 Macroeconomic Theory
ECO 514 Advanced Microeconomics I
ECO 524 Advanced International Finance
ECO 525 Advanced Topics in Economic Development
ECO 571 Advanced Environmental and Resource Economics I
ECO 572 Advanced Environmental and Resource Economics I1
ECO 581 Sustainable Resource Systems and Public Policy
ECO 590 Advanced Topics: Game Theory (2 Credits)
ECO 599 Special Topics: Energy Policy
ECO 599 Special Topics: Global Warming Policy
PAA 627 Environmental Policy and Management
FTY 446 Forest Resources Policy
HTY 577 Environmental History
PHI 432: Environmental Philosophy and Policy

B. Environmental analysis:
ANT 420 Human Impacts on Ancient Environments
BIO 475 Field Marine Ecology
BIO 525 Community Ecology
BIO 546 Aquatic Ecosystems: a Landscape Perspective
CHE 480 Pollution Prevention in Industrial Ecology
CIE 430 Water Treatment
CIE 431 Pollutant Fate and Transport
CIE 533 Environmental Aquatic Chemistry
CIE 534 Environmental Microbiology
CIE 555 Environmental Hydrology
EES 418 Environmental Assessment and Management Techniques
EES 489 Critical Issues in Ecology and Environmental Sciences Policy
EES 497 Independent Studies in Ecology and Environmental Sciences
EES 590 Special Topics in Ecology and Environmental Science
FES 407 Forest Ecology
FES 541 Disturbance Ecology of Forest Ecosystems
INT 460 Environmental Aspects of Aquaculture
INT 482 Pesticides and the Environment
SMS 552 Ecological Approaches to Marine Resource Management
SMS 553 Institutions and the Management of Common Pool Resources
SMS 558 History of Uses and Abuses of the Coastal Zone
SMS 555 Resource Management in Cross-culture Perspectives
SMS 552 Ecological Approaches to Fisheries Management
SMS 562 Fisheries Population Dynamics
WLE 410 Wildlife Population Dynamics and Conservation
WLE 423 Wetland Ecology and Conservation
WLE 445 Management of Endangered and Threatened Species
WLE 555 Landscape Ecology and Conservation

International Trade and Commerce (18 credits)

This specialization prepares students for international business careers with a policy emphasis, while adding a substantial understanding of the effects of international business on development, the environment, and social conditions in recipient countries. Students will study the economics of international trade and finance, the cultural and political as well as economic factors that shape international business behavior, the specific effects of international business activity on growth, wealth distribution, the environment, labor conditions, and politics, the interaction of business and government in developed and developing countries, and the specific ways by which international business might be influenced or regulated to achieve goals beyond profit.

All students in this concentration will be required to take 18 credits at the 400 or higher level from the list below. A maximum of 15 BUA credits may be taken.  Several BUA courses have a prerequisite requirement – students enrolling in these courses will need to successfully complete the prerequisite requirement.

Business
BUA 445 – International Management
BUA 455 – International Corporate Finance
BUA 596 – International Field Study (trip)
BUA 620 – Law, Business and Society
BUA 630 – Industrial Relations and Personnel Management
BUA 639 – Contemporary Issues in International Business
BUA 645 – Selected Advanced Topics in Business Administration
BUA 651 – Financial Management
BUA 652 – Management of Financial Institutions
BUA 668 – Electronic Commerce

Economics
ECO 449 – International Trade
ECO 511 – Macroeconomic Theory
ECO 524 – Advanced International Finance
ECO 525 – Advanced Topics in Economic Development
ECO 533 – Economics of Human Capital
ECO 545 – Advanced Regional Economics
ECO 597 – Independent Studies

International Security and Foreign Policy (15-18 credits)
This concentration equips students with fundamental theoretical and analytical knowledge necessary for professional research, management, and policy positions in both governmental and non-governmental organizations. The concentration takes a multidisciplinary approach to international security and foreign policy, stressing analytical skills, research methods, threat assessment and mitigation, decision-making processes and organizational management, as well as many of the defining substantive security issues of the 21st century.

All students in this concentration will be required to take: SPI 574/POS 474 Conduct of US Foreign Policy and SPI 575/POS 475 International Security (both described below), and will be required to take three to four additional courses at the 400 or higher level. In planning a program of study, please keep in mind that graduates need special permission from the Graduate School to use more than 6 credits at the 400 level towards a Masters degree.

SPI574/POS 474 – Conduct of Foreign Policy
This class examines the formulation and implementation of American foreign policy. Special focus will be placed on American Political culture; Presidential and congressional powers in foreign policy; government bureaucracies, such as the Departments of State, Defense and Treasury; and conceptual and theoretical approaches to policy making.

SPI575/POS 475 – International Security
This class examines national and international factors affecting the survival and security of states. Topics include components and use of military power, arms control and proliferation, the cause and resolution of conflict, negotiation and decision-making processes and structures.

Preapproved Electives (all 3 Credits unless noted).
To provide students with flexibility in course selection appropriate to their career goals, other courses can be substituted with approval from the SPIA graduate coordinator.

ANT 454 Cultures and Societies of the Middle East
ANT 458 Anthropology of War
ANT 461 Islamic Fundamentalism
ANT 464 Ecological Anthropology
ANT 465 Political Anthropology
ANT 466 Economic Anthropology
ANT 467 Peasant Studies
ANT 469 Theories of Religion
ANT 470 Religion and Politics
ANT 491 Intercultural Understanding
ECO 443 Introduction to Modern Economic Growth
ECO 449 International Trade
ECO 511 Macroeconomic Theory
ECO 581 Sustainable Resource Systems and Public Policy
ECO 590 Advanced Topics: Game Theory (2 Credits)
ECO 599 Special Topics: Energy Policy
ECO 599 Special Topics: Global Warming Policy
HTY 405 Early Modern Europe: Renaissance, Reformation and the Foundation of the Modern World-System
HTY 408 19th Century Europe, 1815-1914
HTY 409 Twentieth Century Europe I, 1914-1945
HTY 410 20th Century Europe II, Since 1945
HTY 473 History of U.S. Foreign Relations I
HTY 474 History of U.S. Foreign Relations II
HTY 501 History of U.S. Foreign Relations
HTY 521 Canada and the United States, 1783 to the Present
HTY 607 Seminar in American Foreign Relations
INT 486 China Experience
INT 586 China Travel and Study
POS 476 Seminar in World Politics
POS 596 Directed Research in Political Science
SPI 590 Special Topics: Directed Reading in US Foreign Policy
SPI 590 Special Topics: Directed Reading in Security Studies and Conflict

 


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October 27, 2014
The Middle East and (What's Left of) Syria
Talk by Shibley Telhami, The Anwar Sadat Professor for Peace and Development at the University of Maryland, College Park, and non-resident senior fellow at the Saban Center at the Brookings Institution
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